Yamaha V-Max 1200 VMX1200 (1985-2007) Maintenance Schedule and Service Intervals

This is the maintenance schedule and associated service intervals for the Yamaha V-Max 1200, also known as the VMX1200.

This is the first-generation V-Max. It had an 1198cc V-four engine based on the earlier Yamaha Star Venture tourer, but tuned for a lot more power. It’s an impractical, loud, not very good-handling (“wobbly”) but torque-laden beast that did insane things like use two carbs per cylinder (“V-boost”) and an early form of mass centralisation that centralised mass, but didn’t really improve handling.

The V-Max was revamped in 2008 (and slightly renamed to become the Yamaha VMAX) with a bigger engine, fuel injection, and handling that actually worked (somewhat) better.

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Yamaha V-Max Maintenance Schedule

Below is the maintenance schedule for the Yamaha V-Max.

In Europe, Asia, and Australia, and the US, the contents of the service schedule below is the same. However, in Europe, Asia, and Australia, maintenance intervals are typically longer for Yamaha motorcycles — 10000 km (6000 miles) and 12 months.

Maintenance notes

  • The break-in schedule is omitted, as the break-in period has long passed (and this model is not sold new).
  • After the end of the maintenance schedule, repeat it in the pattern shown.
mi x 100048121620
km x 1000713192531
months612182430Every
Change engine oil (warm engine before draining) (Yamalube 10W-40)
Replace oil filter (HF303RC)
Check cooling system hoses for cracks and damage.
Change coolant (ethylene glycol-based coolant)2 years
Check final oil level and for oil leakage.
Change final gear oil
Lubricate control and meter cables thoroughly (Protect All Cable Life)
Check throttle operation and free play. Lubricate the throttle grip housing and cable (Protect all cable life)
Check spark plug condition. Adjust gap and clean.
Replace spark plugs (NGK DPR8EA-9)
Check and adjust valve clearance when engine is cold.26600 mi (42000 km)
Adjust synchronization of carburetors.
Check and adjust engine idle speed.
Check air filter. Replace as necessary (YA-1285)
Check battery specific gravity and breather pipe for proper operation
Check clutch operation and for fluid leakage.
Check front and rear brake operation, fluid level, and for fluid leakage.
Replace brake pads if necessary.
Replace brake fluid (Castrol DOT 4) and rubber parts of calipers and master cylinder.2 years
Check brake hoses for cracks or damage.
Replace brake hoses4 years
Check fuel lines and vacuum pipes for cracks or damage.
Replace fuel filter
Check wheels for runout and for damage.
Replace if necessary.
Check tire tread depth and for damage.
Replace if necessary.
Check wheel bearings for smooth rotation.
Replace if necessary.
Check swingarm bearing assemblies for looseness.
Repack swingarm pivot bearings with lithium soap-based grease
Check steering bearing assembly for looseness
Moderately repack steering bearings with lithium-soap-based grease
Check all chassis fittings and fasteners for tightness
Lubricate lever and pedal pivot shafts with lithium-soap-based grease lightly.
Check sidestand and center stand (as fitted) operation. Apply lithium-soap-based grease lightly.
Check sidestand switch operation and replace if necessary
Check front fork operation and for oil leakage.
Check shock absorber operation and for oil leakage.
Check crankcase breather hose for cracks or damage.
Check exhaust system for leakage. Tighten seals or replace gaskets as necessary.
Check evap control system (if fitted) for damage.
Maintenance schedule for the Yamaha V-Max

About the Yamaha V-Max 1200

1988 Yamaha V-Max 1200 BaT Red RHS
1988 Yamaha V-Max 1200 – For sale on BringATrailer

The Yamaha V-Max won a place in motorcyclists heart from the day it was launched.

It’s a weird concept — a cruiser with a high-performance liquid-cooled 1198cc V-4 engine. It’s an unusual engine from the outset, being a V4 engine in a cruiser. But add liquid cooling and the fact that it’s “modest” in capacity (for a cruiser), and the situation gets even more strange.

Modern motorcyclist owners might think of V4s as being the domain mostly of performance motorcycles. Anyone paying attention from 2018 onward would think of the Ducati Panigale V4, who stole the show, mostly because of breaking tradition with a long history of V2s.

Other aficionados might think of the Tuono V4, or maybe the Honda VFR800, who was quietly using a V4 in a modest everyday bike for quite a long time (decades, if you follow the full history).

Yamaha, too, have used V4s for a long time, including in cruisers, but the original V-Max was one of the first.

The V-Max’s liquid-cooled DOHC 16-valve 70-degree V4 is a torque monster — for its tiem, anyway. It’s fed by four 35mm Mikuni downdraft carburettors which help give it very quick throttle response.

Then there’s Yamaha’s patented “V-BOOST” induction mechanism, an intake system that force-feeds fuel/air mixture via a servo-controlled butterfly valve at 6000 rpm.

All in all, the Yamaha V-Max 1200 makes a peak of 86 ft-lb (115 Nm) of torque at 6000 rpm, and a peak of 102 hp (74 kW) at 8000 rpm in stock form.

Power goes to the ground via a 5-speed transmission and a shaft drive.

Maintaining the Yamaha V-Max is typical for Yamaha liquid-cooled performance motorcycles. You have to change the oil at every service 4000 mile service (or 10000 km in Europe/APAC), and adjust valves mercifully rarely, every 26600 miles or 42000 km.

Manual for the Yamaha V-Max 1200

The above information was gleaned from the owner’s manual for the 2005-2007 Yamaha V-Max, incorporating notes from earlier maintenance schedules from other manuals.

A screenshot from the manual for the manual is below.

2005-2007 Yamaha VMAX Maintenance schedule screenshot from manual

You can download it from Yamaha’s website here.

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